Joint Tenancy Pitfalls: The ‘Simple’ Fix that Can Leave Your Family Broke

There are many ways to own your assets. When you die, it is only natural that you want your family to share in the bounty of your hard work. As a way to simplify the transfer process and avoid probate, you may be tempted to add a child or other relative to the deed or bank account utilizing the ownership type of joint tenancy with right of survivorship (JTwROS).  However, while this type of ownership delivers a lot of potential benefits, it may also be masking some dangerous pitfalls.

Under JTwROS, when one owner dies, the other owner(s) inherit the deceased owner’s share of the property proportionately. Its benefits are specific: ownership is transferred automatically without entering probate. Because the property is transferred outside of probate, it is possible to keep this inheritance out of the clutches of creditors of your estate.   On the surface, this seems like a smart way to streamline the inheritance process, sidestep creditor baggage, and bureaucratic charges. But the risks may outweigh the benefits.

You May Pay the Price

One of the main problems with JTwROS is that when you enter into this kind of agreement, you open yourself up to additional liability. When you agree to a JTwROS, you put your assets on the hook for the other owners’ creditors, ex-spouses and flights of fancy.

Another problem with JTwROS, as it relates to real estate, is that there are now multiple owners of the property. You must now get the approval of the other owners if you would like to mortgage, refinance, transfer, or sell the property. It does not matter if you are the only one who is occupying the property or paying the expenses, by adding additional people as owners, you are giving away control.

With respect to any bank accounts, once you add an additional owner, that individual, as an owner, has the right to go to the bank and withdraw whatever money is in the account. The bank is merely going to make sure that the individual is listed on the account and will freely turn over your money to him or her. If a joint owner’s creditor serves the bank with a garnishment order, they can also seize the money in the account, even if the joint owner was only added to help avoid probate.

Disinheriting Loved Ones

While JTwROS can have some impacts on you, it can also disrupt your estate plans because instead of property getting handed down, it’s handed over. For example, if someone with children remarries and a new spouse is added to the deed as a joint tenant, that new spouse will inherit the property, not the kids or grandkids. Because there’s a new spouse involved, the new spouse’s family will then be the ones to inherit upon his or her death, leaving the whole ‘branch’ of the original family may be disinherited—and not always intentionally!

Questions? Give Us a Call

Although there are some advantages to a JTwROS, don’t let simplicity or speed be your only measures. Give us a call so we can discussing all of your options and tailor a solution that will best fit your needs.

Steps For Starting the End-of-Life Conversation

No one wants to discuss death and dying. And yet, it’s a critical time in everyone’s life and one for which we know we need to prepare. While many people have the desire to share their wishes, something is preventing people from openly communicating with their families.

As an important part of estate planning, healthcare decisions need to be talked about. This helps preserve your legacy and provide peace of mind for your loved ones. You can rest easy knowing that if they need to act, they are carrying out your end-of-life wishes as you would want.

If you’ve been dreading having this talk with your own parents, children or other family members, there are a number of steps you can consider.

Just Ask

Before launching into this tough conversation, it’s not a bad idea to pose the question “when?”  Ask your loved one when they might have time to discuss your estate planning and healthcare decisions. By introducing the topic in this matter, no one is caught off guard and it can help everyone to reflect on what they really want to communicate before sitting down.

Aim for Clarity

Do whatever you can to help make these conversations clear. Write out a list of major points you want to make ahead of time. Be prepared that your family may come with questions they want to ask about—inclusion of family members in the decision-making process, preferences for memorials, etc.. Simplicity and clarity can help neutralize the feelings of anxiety that everyone may be having and help everyone walk away from the conversation with the peace of mind they were hoping for.

Don’t Get Sidetracked

This is a tough one. Likely no one really wants to talk about it, or would rather talk about something else. But you’ve got to get through it. So even though the conversation will no doubt be rife with opportunity to reflect, remember and opine, try to stay on task. You want to make sure that everyone walks away from the conversation with a better understanding than when it began.

Keep the Conversation Going

While it may feel like a one-time conversation because it’s emotional, or hard to have if your loved one lives far away, remember that it’s not a one-time deal. You are simply opening the lines of conversation, not setting anything in stone. Remembering this will help empower everyone to be open.

Need Assistance? Give Us a Call

Talking about your end of life decisions can be hard, but it is an essential part of estate planning.  If you have any further questions about how to have these conversations or would like us to help facilitate this discussion, please feel free to contact us.  We are here to help!

One Call You Must Make After You Buy a Home (That You’ve Probably Forgotten)

During the home buying process, you worked with a lot of individuals: your realtor, the seller’s realtor, the title company, the loan officer, and the home inspector.  Now that you have finalized the purchase of your house, there is one more expert you need to call: your estate planning attorney.

Aligning Your Ownership with Existing Estate Planning

First, your attorney can help you review the new documents associated with your home purchase in conjunction with your existing estate plan to ensure that everything aligns and works towards your overall estate planning objectives. If your existing estate plans include a trust that owns all of your assets, it is crucial that your new home is titled in the name of the trust and not in your name individually (or jointly if married).

General Review/Update of Your Estate Plan

Since you have engaged in a new life changing event, now is the perfect time to review your existing plan. This is a great opportunity to make sure that the individuals you have appointed in the crucial roles of guardian, executor, agent, or trustee are still able to carry out those duties when the need arises. With the passage of time, these individuals may have moved away, died, or otherwise undergone a life change themselves that makes them a less than desirable candidate to act on your behalf.

While you are reviewing your estate plans, it is also important that you review the dispositive language.  Do you still want to have your assets divided the same way? Have the needs of your beneficiaries changed over the years? To ensure that you are protecting and providing for your beneficiaries, you need to make sure that the provisions are set up for the best individualized protection.

Lastly, if the purchase of your new home is in a different state, you will definitely want to visit an estate planning attorney.  By changing states, the documents you previously have prepared may not adequately protect you and your family.  Each state has unique laws regarding trusts and estates, you will need to make sure that any documents you are currently relying on are enforceable in your new state. Unenforceable or not-optimized documents can be just as bad as having no estate planning documents at all.

Give us a call.

Buying a new home is a great new adventure.  Give us a call so we can make sure that you are embarking on this new chapter in your life fully protected.

 

The Biggest Threats to Successful Estate Planning

Poor estate planning is a recipe for disaster. Look no further than Dickens’ Bleak House—or a telenovela—to witness the tragedy and melodrama inadequate estate planning can cause. While having your estate planning documents prepared is the first hurdle to overcoming these types of disasters, there are several threats that lurk around the corner that might derail your wishes.

Family Conflict

According to a TF Wealth survey of over 100 estate planning professionals, family conflict is the number one risk to a peaceful inheritance. If children are treated differently under the estate plan, there is often an assumption that a mistake was made in drafting the documents or that someone has exerted undue influence on the parent. While this may not be the case, without any guidance from you, family members can begin to think the worst of each other.

 

Sloppy or No Estate Planning

If you have not done any estate planning or if what you have done is ineffective, your estate will be subject to your state’s intestate laws. These laws predetermine who will inherit your assets and in what proportion. While these statutory schemes might work for some people, they will have adverse consequences for those who have been married multiple times, have children from prior relationships, or children who need additional asset protection. If you haven’t done any estate planning, you’re simply leaving your inheritance and your legacy in the hands of the government.

In order to ensure that your wishes are being carried out and safe from the ever present dangers, it is important that you know what a successful estate plan looks like.

No (or Little) Family Conflict

The goal here is for there to be no surprises. If you are choosing to treat children or other family members differently, be open and honest about it. It may be helpful to have a conversation about your wishes prior to your death so that those individuals understand why you have made those decisions. Even if you choose to not have such a conversation, it’s important to discuss your plan and reasons with your attorney, so that the plan can be drafted to carry out your wishes.

Eliminate (or Minimize) Costs and Taxes

Watching inheritance get whittled away by taxes and fees will only lead to frustration and hard feelings. When preparing your estate plan, your intent is to benefit your loved ones, not the government. Working with a qualified estate planning attorney can help ensure that your assets are being handled in such a way that the administrative costs of your passing and any income or estate tax are minimized or avoided.

A Chosen Representative

It is possible that, later in life, you may not be able to handle all of your affairs yourself and may require some assistance from a loved one, whether it be with your finances or healthcare. Look for someone you trust who understands you and your desires. Don’t necessarily rely on someone just because they are the most convenient. And, don’t rely on hope that everyone will know who you want to be in charge. You must ensure that you’ve granted proper authority using a power of attorney, a trust, and a will.

Ensure that Everyone Gets What You Want

Your assets may be, or may in some way, represent your legacy. Do some real soul-searching about how and what you want to share this with your family and friends. To ensure that your legacy is passed on in a meaningful way, consider including an explanation as to why someone is receiving a particular inheritance. If you have wishes as to how they use a gift of money, he or she may appreciate hearing the hopes and dreams you have for them and their future even though you are no longer with them.

Documents Are Up-to-Date

Life can change quickly. It is important that you review your estate planning documents with each life change (i.e. birth or death of a family member, purchase or sale of a major asset, change in health, etc.). It is also important that we stay in touch. Contact us when these major life changes occur and we will contact you when there are changes in the law. This will help ensure that your documents stay effective and your wishes are carried out.

So do the groundwork that a little planning requires. And leave the melodrama for entertainment. Give us a call today. We’re here to help.

Finding the Right Fit: Questions For Prospective Wills and Trusts Attorneys

It goes without saying that estate planning is incredibly important and is more than just having a will or a trust. Estate planning offers a sense of security for you and your loved ones that your wishes will be carried out. With such an important and personal endeavor, selecting the right Wills and Trusts Attorney is crucial.

Doing your homework, familiarizing yourself with the options and asking questions will be critical to getting someone who’s actively looking out for your interests.

There are several key factors you should consider when interviewing potential attorneys and ultimately deciding which one to hire. 

Funding a Trust

Will your estate planner help with funding your trust (or otherwise aligning asset ownership with your plan)? How much of the funding process with they do for you?

For some clients, this can be a critical service due to the complexity of assets he or she may own that need to be accounted for. Having someone thorough and reliable in this part of the process will make it easier to ensure the estate planning is completed properly.

Organization and Payment

What does your estate planning process look like? How long will it take until the entire process is complete? When is payment due and how do I pay?

These questions may seem simple, but, not unlike when you pay for home repairs, it’s important to have an idea of the end date of the process. It is also important to know when you are expected to provide information and payment so that you are not the cause of any delays. Additionally, you never want surprises when it comes to payment amounts or dates. It is common to put down a retainer or deposit with an attorney, but it’s always important to know ahead of time.

Long-term Access

What long-term plans do you have for your firm? Will you or another attorney in your firm be around to help me in the future?

Creating a will or trust isn’t a one-and-done process. Wills and trusts are frequently revisited over the years because of changes in your circumstances and in the law. If at all possible, it’s best to have the same attorneys working with you. Although you can switch attorneys or firms each time you need an update, attorneys with plans to continue to offer services into the future can be a safer bet to ensuring continuity in your estate planning.

Planning for the Future

Can you help my family members if I become sick or when I die? Just because an attorney prepares estate planning documents, does not mean that they will help with estate or trust administration. Having the attorney who prepared your estate planning documents assist your family during times of incapacity or at your death can be extremely helpful. Since he or she is already aware of your wishes and will have a copy of your documents, addressing these difficult situations can be quicker and involve less hassle.

Have Questions? Let Us Answer Them

There’s no reason to get overwhelmed by the choice of a wills and trusts attorney. Asking just a few simple, but critical, questions can help you find someone who’s on the same page. Give us a call today to schedule an appointment.  We would be happy to answer these questions and any others you may have.

The One Thing Every New Grandparent MUST Do As Soon as Possible

Congratulations on welcoming the newest addition to your family. Being a new grandparent changes everything — including how you approach your finances — and is one of the most joyous occasions in life. The excitement of a new baby — and all of the firsts that come with this bundle of joy — can grab all of your attention and focus. That being said, there is one thing that every new grandparent must do as soon as possible that is often overlooked. Specifically, every new grandparent should immediately create (or revise) an estate plan so that it includes your family’s newest generation.

Estate Planning for Grandchildren

 Having an intentional financial strategy for incorporating your new grandchild’s future in your overall estate plan is an important part in addressing your growing family’s needs.

Not having an estate plan can have unintended results for your surviving family members. This is because intestacy — or your state’s applicable laws that determine who receives your assets upon your death if you have no estate plan — may not work the way you’d expect. As a result, it can have disastrous results for grandparents who had other intentions or plans for their assets. Instead of having the government decide who gets your asset when you die, now is the time to take control, while you can still put your wishes down on paper.

Failing to update an existing estate plan when a grandchild is born can be just as disastrous as intestacy. While you may have contemplated the birth of grandchildren in your initial estate plan, you may not have put a mechanism in place to ensure your grandchild receives the maximum benefit you intended. Likewise, failing to review or revise a beneficiary designation may inadvertently disinherit a grandchild. A comprehensive trust with coordinated asset ownership is the best way to fully protect your multi-generational family.

Options for Grandparents

There are several ways to plan for your grandchildren’s future. There are also different tools that may be used to incorporate this newer generation into an estate plan.

One way is to give the gift of education. With college tuition rising every year for both private and public universities, setting aside money for your grandchild’s education is one way to plan for their future success. With a 529 plan, you can set money aside that has the potential to grow tax-free until it is needed. Better still, the 529 money remains tax-free when spent on qualified higher education expenses.

Another way to provide for your grandchildren is by establishing a trust. You can set aside a specific amount of money that can be used only for your minor grandchild’s benefit. The child’s parent, or even grandparents themselves, can be listed as the custodians of the account. As a custodian, the designated adult can make spending decisions on behalf of the minor child until he or she reaches the age of majority in his or her state of residence — or the age listed in the trust instrument.

To help ensure a successful future for your new grandchild, contact a knowledgeable estate planning attorney to learn about the options you have available so you can provide for this child’s future.

How to Fix 5 Common Estate Planning Problems

Not surprisingly, most people loathe reviewing their estate plan because it can be both confusing and daunting. Others do not want to think about death and avoid the topic altogether. If you already have put an estate plan together, you are ahead of the curve as many people do not have one. If you do not yet have an estate plan, there is no better time than now to sit down and get one in place. In either scenario, below are five common estate planning mistakes and how to fix them so that you are fully protecting your family.

 

  1. You Have Not Updated Your Plan

Many people consider estate planning a “one and done” proposition. This could not be further from the truth. Life happens. This may include adding new beneficiaries due to the birth of children or grandchildren, or removing beneficiaries due to a change in circumstances. Your family’s needs will almost certainly have changed over the years since you first created your estate plan. Likewise, your executor – the person who will be in charge of your assets in the event of your untimely death – may have passed away or may no longer be able to serve. For these reasons, it is key to keep your beneficiaries and successor executors current.

 

  1. Your Plan is Missing Key Components

While you may already have an estate plan in place, it may not be comprehensive enough to fully protect your loved ones after you have passed. At a minimum everyone should have a last will and testament, a financial power of attorney, and a health care directive. These documents should have been reviewed by a knowledgeable estate plan attorney within the last 5 years and immediately after any major life event, such as a marriage, divorce, birth or death of a child,  receiving an inheritance, or significant increase or decrease in assets. With these life changes, the level of protection you need may have also changed. Relying on an old strategy may leave you and your loved ones vulnerable.

 

  1. You Have Not Kept Up with Changes in Tax Laws

In the past twenty years, the estate tax exemption has increased by fifteen times. If you have significant wealth you need to make sure your estate plan takes advantage of unique planning opportunities under current law. This is because an outdated estate plan structure that has not kept up with current tax law can actually do more harm than good for your loved ones, since it may needlessly cause taxes to be paid. Accordingly, a qualified estate planning attorney who fully understands your circumstances should review your documents and make any necessary adjustments.

 

  1. You Moved Without Updating Your Estate Documents

It is important to understand that each state has different laws that governs estate planning. For this reason, if you move from one state to another it is vital that you have a local estate planning attorney review and revise your documents. You want to make certain your plan is compliant with the laws in the state in which you primarily reside. This also applies to medical powers of attorney or advance directives that may be valid in your old state but ruled invalid in your new state, depending on the local law.

 

  1. You Failed to Focus on Life Insurance and Retirement Accounts

One common mistake is for individuals to fail to review life insurance policies after they were originally issued. Neglected policies may not be properly funded, resulting in a lapse in coverage and requiring hefty premiums to keep the policy in force. Likewise, it is important to take advantage of listing beneficiaries on retirement accounts rather than leaving them to your estate. When a beneficiary is listed, these assets avoid probate – the long and expensive legal process of distributing your assets upon your death through court supervision – and allows beneficiaries to keep the majority of these funds in tax-advantaged accounts.

 

We’re Here to Help.

Without proper maintenance and administration, your carefully put together estate plan may not work as you intend. Instead of allowing this to happen, give us a call today, so we can begin reviewing your estate plan to make sure all of your bases are covered and any needed changes are made.

 

Financial Planning. Tax Planning. Legacy Planning. Estate Planning – How many plans do I need?!

Most folks have at least heard of an estate plan. But fewer realize that a simple will is not enough to prepare for your future. In fact, a combination of plans – financial, tax, legacy, and estate – are vital to your financial well-being and protection of your assets and family. All of these plans are closely linked, affecting one another but also serving different purposes.

Different Plans for Life Success

 Contrary to popular belief, in order to get to where you want to go in life you need multiple plans, each intended for a specific area of your life.

 Financial plan: The purpose of a financial plan is to grow your wealth. It defines your goals and objectives, determines what choices you need to make to achieve them, and creates a checklist so that you can meet your goals. Financial plans focus on sustaining your cash flow so that you are able to live the life that you want. Your financial plan may also involve saving for short and long term goals. In addition to investments and insurance, you may also take advantage of any benefits from your employer, including retirement fund contribution matching and group life insurance. Through a financial plan, you can also put together the necessary foundation so that your family is financially prepared in the event of an emergency.

Tax plan: Tax planning is analyzing your financial situation through a tax lens. Specifically, the purpose of tax planning is to make sure you are taking advantage of all opportunities to minimize your tax bill. For example, you may contribute to retirement plans or decide to sell or buy certain investments as part of your tax plan. Not surprisingly, tax planning and financial planning are closely intertwined. This is because taxes play a large part of many people’s annual expenses.

Estate plan: Estate planning is the process of arranging your legal affairs so people you trust are authorized to make decisions for you when you can’t and so that your assets are distributed to the beneficiaries you choose upon your death. Generally, an estate plan includes several legal strategies that protect your wealth and loved ones.  It will also ensure that someone you trust can help you if you can’t make your own decisions. This is one of the most important plans a person can create to ensure their final property and health care wishes are followed and that the loved ones left behind are provided for in their absence.

Legacy plan: A legacy plan is just what it sounds like — a plan to proactively create and take control of the legacy that you will leave behind. Legacies are built and a plan can help you accomplish this. Without a legacy plan, you may drift through your life reacting to circumstances as they arise without intentionally thinking about them. You may also miss opportunities to share meaningful lessons or values with your loved ones. A legacy plan enables you to consciously shape how you will be remembered after you die. This could include charitable giving, sharing family history, as well as conveying moral and spiritual values.

 Bringing it All Together

It is important to have several advisors to help you properly craft your financial, tax, legacy, and estate plans for your life and beyond. An attorney’s role is to create and oversee the legal structure that serves as the vessel through which your plans achieve your goals. A wealth or financial advisor’s role is to handle the financial planning aspects to make sure you are on track to meet your goals. An accountant integrates tax planning through careful analysis of the latest tax laws applicable to your particular situation. Your clergy or spiritual advisor can provide you help in crafting your legacy plan. In short, not only should you have all of these plans, but you should also consult with professionals to help you create and execute them successfully.

Why Not Just Go Online and Create Your Own Estate Planning Documents Cheaply?

There are many software programs, as well as websites, that sell do-it-yourself estate planning documents. These websites and form tools seem to offer a convenient and cost-effective alternative to consulting with an estate planning attorney. But do they really meet your needs and protect your family? Is online, do-it-yourself estate planning worth the perceived upfront savings?

Penny Wise and Pound Foolish

In all but the simplest scenarios, do-it-yourself estate planning is risky and can become a costly substitute for comprehensive in-person planning with a professional legal advisor. Typically, these online programs and services have significant limitations when it comes to gathering information needed to properly craft an estate plan. This can result in crucial defects that, sadly, won’t become apparent until the situation becomes a legal and financial nightmare for your loved ones.

Creating your own estate plan without professional advice can also have unintended consequences. Bad or thoughtless documents can be invalid and/or useless when they are needed. For example, you can create a plan that has no instructions for when a beneficiary passes away or when a specific asset left to a loved one no longer exists. You may create a trust on your own but fail to fund it, resulting in your assets being tied up in probate courts, potentially for years. Worse yet, what you leave behind may then pass to those you did not intend.

Your family situation and assets are unique. Plus, each state has its own laws governing what happens when someone becomes incapacitated or dies. These nuances may not be adequately addressed in an off-the-shelf document. In addition, non-traditional families, or those with a complicated family arrangement, require more thorough estate planning. The options available in a do-it-yourself system may not provide the solutions that are necessary. A computer program or website cannot replicate the intricate knowledge a qualified local estate planning attorney will have and use to apply to your particular circumstances.

If you’re a person of significant wealth, then concerns about income and estate taxes enter the picture too. In addition to the federal estate tax, some states have a separate estate tax systems with significantly different tax thresholds. An online estate planning website or program that prepares basic wills without taking into account the size of the estate can result in hundreds of thousands of dollars in increased (and usually completely avoidable) tax liability. A qualified estate planning attorney will know how to structure your legal affairs to properly manage – or, in many cases, even avoid – the burden of the death tax as well as minimize the impact of ongoing income taxes.

One important aspect of estate planning is protecting adult children from the negative financial consequences of divorce, bankruptcy, lawsuits, or illness. An online planning tool will not take these additional steps into account when putting together what is usually a basic estate plan. Similarly, parents who have children or adult loved ones with special needs must take extra caution when planning. There are complicated rules regarding government benefits that these loved ones may receive that must be considered, so that valuable benefits are not lost due to an inheritance.

Consult an Estate Planning Attorney

No matter how good a do-it-yourself estate planning document may seem, it is no substitute for personalized advice. Estate planning is more than just document production. In many cases, the right legal solution to your situation may not be addressed by these do-it-yourself products – affecting not just you, but generations to come. To make sure you are fully protecting your family, contact us today. We’re here to help.

Beneficiary Designations and a Blended Family: Why You Need to Think Before You Sign

Whether you are in your first marriage or have remarried after a divorce, blended families are a common part of modern society. That being said, it is important to understand that blended families and subsequent marries create important and unique issues when it comes to estate planning. You may need to account for a prior spouse who is still caring for minor or disabled children, and also possibly make sure your current spouse and any children you had together – and any step children – are also taken care of after you pass away. The good news is that estate planning can take all of these factors into account. This is true whether you are putting together your estate plan for the very first time or if you need to update your current estate plan due to a change in your circumstances.

 

Setting Up a Trust

It is common for married couples to leave everything to one another in their wills, or list their spouse as the sole beneficiary of any assets that allow for this designation. The result is that if one spouse passes away before the other, the surviving spouse will own all of the assets left behind outright. While this may work for some families, when it comes to blended families this strategy may inadvertently disinherit children or spouses from a prior marriage. One way to provide for a current spouse without leaving out children from a prior marriage is to place some or all of your assets in a trust that the spouse can use during his or her lifetime. Once the spouse dies, all of the property in the trust can go to the children from your current and prior marriage, or to other intended beneficiaries.

Beyond Simple Beneficiary Designation

The plain and simple beneficiary designation on assets (like life insurance, bank and investment accounts, etc.) that allow for outright distribution to the surviving spouse can inadvertently wreak havoc on an estate plan when a blended family is involved. These complications can apply to a couple who has children from prior marriages, someone who remarries late in life, or someone on their second or third marriage and beyond.

For example, you may purchase a large life insurance policy and designate your current spouse as the sole beneficiary and pass away shortly thereafter. Since the beneficiary designation takes precedence over your estate planning documents, the proceeds of the life insurance will not be placed in that trust and will be distributed outright to your current spouse. If you had instead named the trust as beneficiary, you could have determined when and how the funds would be spent for the benefit of your heirs. As an example, the funds could be used to provide support for your surviving spouse during his or her lifetime while also allocating a portion to help your children to pay for college, finance a down payment on a first home, pay for a wedding, or start a business. The key is that the money can be available for your spouse, but not with unfettered control, and still available for your children.

Ensuring Your Wishes Are Followed

While you hope that a surviving spouse with honor your wishes even if they are not in writing, you may accidentally disinherit your children. Instead, a knowledgeable estate planner will use your trust as the centerpiece of your estate plan and make sure to coordinate and align the beneficiaries on your assets so that your intent will become the reality once you have passed away. We can explain all of the options available to you and put together a plan that best suits your family’s needs.